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'Understanding other people's worldview' - Common Application Essay 'Diversity'


answers: 4
Dec 30, 2008, 01:07pm   #1
Please Help me with Grammer and Content!
Any Comments are welcome.


Understanding other people's worldview and different culture was hard for me. I used to be a narrow-minded Korean who only appreciated Korean culture. But throughout the two years of American life, I gradually gained an understanding of the American culture and learned to appreciate the diversity.
"We have good news for you. We found you a host family in America." After going to a unique Christian dormitory school in Korea, I came to America as a diligent exchange student hoping to achieve a dream. I was placed in Chattanooga, a small southern town in Tennessee, with a conservative southern white family. Since I've never been to America, I was not aware of American culture. With much culture shock, I began to encounter American culture.
The family would tell me their views on many different issues: Anti-gay rights, Pro-life, Small government and de-regulation. They even brought me to a gun range and let me shoot different kinds of guns. As a person coming from a country where possession of firearm is prohibited, I was anxious to live in a country where people are allowed to have guns. I asked them "Is the right to bear arms more important than preventing possible murder?" They replied adamantly "If government takes gun away from people, we couldn't defend ourselves when a dictatorial government takes over America." I was surprised to hear such reply from Americans whose democratic government was so profoundly established.
Next year, I moved in to a southern African-American family. I attended a 100% African American church where people sung without any musical instruments. Even though I lived in America for a year, I realized that there are much more to discover.
However, I discovered differences in mindset between myself and the family. I was an overly motivated perfectionist, and they were laid-back southern people. On one weekend, the father of the family asked me to mow the lawn. Since I have never mowed the lawn, I went outside thinking it would be a quick job. I not only learned how to mow the grass, but spent over two hours cutting the grass. I knew it was important to do family chores, but I was upset because mowing the lawn took away my studying time for test next week.
After watching my perfectionist characteristics, the father of the family told me that I will have a breakdown and become depressed because nobody is perfect. He also told me to enjoy the life and not be upset by making a poor grade on an English test. Although I did not completely agree with his worldview, I realized that I might become very depressed when I fail to achieve something important. I've also seen myself always in hurry and too serious, so I have been rarely happy. After living with this laid-back family, I have learned to balance my seriousness with happiness.
After living with different American families, I've learned to respect diversity. As a citizen of a world that encompasses countless different cultures, I have to be open-minded towards people with different perspectives, different ethnicity and different social backgrounds. I want to bring my unique perspectives and experiences to college and learn and accept diversity other students bring in order to become a well-rounded person who can work with different people in different environment.

I realized that there is much more to discover.

studying time for tests next week

i like the whole concept of your essay. However, look at the 2 paragraphs before the last paragraph again. Since those paragraphs explain what you have ultimately learned from the whole experience then you can spend more time talking about that because it seems a bit rushed
I had never been to America, so I was not familiar with American culture.

I asked them, "Is the right to bear arms more important than preventing possible murder?" They replied adamantly, "If government takes gun away from people, we couldn't defend ourselves when a dictatorial government takes over America." I was surprised to hear such reply from Americans whose democratic government was so profoundly established.

I agree!!!


The following year, I moved in to a southern African-American family. I attended a 100% African American church where people sang without any musical instruments. Even though I lived in America for only a year, I realized how much diversity there is to be discovered.

Wow, that is so interesting!!!!



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