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'Macbeth and Socratic seminars' - Stanford Univ - Intellectual Vit. essay!


answers: 8
Stanford - Stanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development.

"So for Macbeth, we will be having Socratic seminars!" Students looked at each other with questions posed in their eyes. The teacher explained that these seminars would involve each student sharing their thoughts on the assigned reading and their interpretations of the story. Reading itself had always presented a challenge in understanding to me, now I had to share interpretations? As I began reading the play, I noted key words, names and places. Taking notes on tone and mood, I focused vigorously. For the next week, chanting "Macbeth, Macbeth, Macbeth," my thoughts constantly drifted to the dark play, and I diligently wrote down each meaningful thought and meticulously reviewed my ideas and opinions on the play.
I had no idea what to expect. The teacher asked a compelling question at the beginning of class and after a moment of conscious thought, I raised my hand and answered the question. Another student offered his ideas and the discussion was off! I offered my views, defending them with quotes from my detailed notes. I knew what I was doing, and spoke confidently. As class drew to a close, my teacher approached my desk and applauded my critical thinking, analysis and ability to defend my opinion with fact. I walked around with a smile plastered on my face for the rest of the day.
I discovered my literary voice, and promised myself not to ever let it go. Discussions now appear to me as an opportunity to think and develop, and I have overcome my fear with a realization that hard work and dedication leads to confidence in addition to success. I have discovered more about myself through reading than I could have imagined and have acquired more knowledge by sharing my thoughts and opinions than any other way. The Socratic seminars in sophomore English class propelled my love of books and the development of my thought process.

You should have a better like to your quote in the beginning.
For example: "So for Macbeth, we will be having Socratic seminars!" my teacher exclaimed proudly. Students looked at each other, confused.

I wish you all the best for your essay. :)
"So for Macbeth, we will be having Socratic seminars!" Students looked at each other with questions posed in their eyes. The teacher explained that these seminars would involve each student sharing their thoughts on the assigned reading and their interpretations of the story. Reading itself had always presented a challenge in understanding to me, now I had to share interpretations? As I began reading the play, I noted key words, names and places. Taking notes on tone and mood, I focused vigorously. For the next week, chanting "Macbeth, Macbeth, Macbeth," my thoughts constantly drifted to the dark play, and I diligently wrote down each meaningful thought and meticulously reviewed my ideas and opinions on the play.
I had no idea what to expect. The teacher asked a compelling question at the beginning of class and after a moment of conscious thought, I raised my hand and answered the question. Another student offered his ideas and the discussion was off! I offered my views, defending them with quotes from my detailed notes. I knew what I was doing, and spoke confidently. As class drew to a close, my teacher approached my desk and applauded my critical thinking, analysis and ability to defend my opinion with fact. I walked around with a smile plastered on my face for the rest of the day.
I discovered my literary voice, and promised myself not to ever let it go. Discussions now appear to me as an opportunity to think and develop, and I have overcome my fear with a realization that hard work and dedication leads to confidence in addition to success. I have discovered more about myself through reading than I could have imagined and have acquired more knowledge by sharing my thoughts and opinions than any other way (how so? explain). The Socratic seminars in sophomore English class propelled my love of books and the development of my thought process.

Good job, overall. I think it would be interesting if you provided a dialogue setting where you and another student are arguing about the interpretation. This way, your through process will be better executed to the audience.
Overall it's a great idea and well written essay, but I think that you could add a lot to the essay by being specific with quotations rather than just saying "a question" or something. I know that there's probably a word limit and all so you obviously can't recite the conversation, but if done tastefully it will make a huge difference, I've suggested some spots that could use quotation clarification below

"So for Macbeth, we will be having Socratic seminars!" Students looked at each other with questions posed in their eyes. The teacher explained that these seminars would involve each student sharing their thoughts on the assigned reading and their interpretations of the story. Reading itself had always presented a challenge in understanding to me, now I had to share interpretations? As I began reading the play, I noted key words, names and places. Taking notes on tone and mood, I focused vigorously. For the next week, chanting "Macbeth, Macbeth, Macbeth," my thoughts constantly drifted to the dark play, and I diligently wrote down each meaningful thought and meticulously reviewed my ideas and opinions on the play.
I had no idea what to expect. The teacher asked a compelling question (what question?)at the beginning of class and after a moment of conscious thought, I raised my hand and answered the question (how did you answer it?). Another student offered his ideas and the discussion was off! I offered my views (what views?), defending them with quotes(which quotes?) from my detailed notes. I knew what I was doing, and spoke confidently. As class drew to a close, my teacher approached my desk and applauded my critical thinking, analysis and ability to defend my opinion with fact. I walked around with a smile plastered on my face for the rest of the day.
I discovered my literary voice, and promised myself not to ever let it go. Discussions now appear to me as an opportunity to think and develop, and I have overcome my fear with a realization that hard work and dedication leads to confidence in addition to success. I have discovered more about myself through reading than I could have imagined and have acquired more knowledge by sharing my thoughts and opinions than any other way. The Socratic seminars in sophomore English class propelled my love of books and the development of my thought process.

Good luck!
Dec 30, 2011, 04:42pm   #
Reading itself had always presented a challenge in understanding to me Understanding what i read had always been a challenge for me, now I had to share myinterpretations?

red: add
blue: change
green: delete

haha, its funny, because i'm actually having problems with this essay more than the roomate one :P
fishie21:
"So for Macbeth, we will be having Socratic seminars!" Students looked at each other with questions posed in their eyes. The teacher explained that these seminars would involve each student sharing their thoughts on the assigned reading and their interpretations of the story. Reading itself had always presented a challenge in understanding to me, but now I had to share interpretations? As I began reading the play, I noted key words, names and places. Taking notes on tone and mood, I focused vigorously (sounds kind of odd, maybe rephrase). For the next week, chanting "Macbeth, Macbeth, Macbeth," my thoughts constantly drifted to the dark play, and I diligently wrote down each meaningful thought and meticulously reviewed my ideas and opinions on the play.
I had no idea what to expect. The teacher asked a compelling question at the beginning of class and after a moment of conscious thought, I raised my hand and answered the question. Another student offered his ideas and the discussion took off! I offered my views, defending them with quotes from my detailed notes. I knew what I was doing, and spoke confidently. As class drew to a close, my teacher approached my desk and applauded my critical thinking, analysis and ability to defend my opinion with fact. I walked around with a smile plastered on my face for the rest of the day.
I discovered my literary voice, and promised myself to never let it go. Discussions now appear to me as an opportunity to think and develop, and I have overcome my fear with a realization that hard work and dedication leads to confidence in addition to success. I have discovered more about myself through reading than I could have imagined and have acquired more knowledge by sharing my thoughts and opinions than any other way. The Socratic seminars in sophomore English class propelled my love of books and the development of my thought process.


Pretty good, but in some parts, it sounds like you are just throwing a big word in to impress the admissions officers. While you use the words correctly, they seem out of place and almost disrupt the flow of the essay. Something I do that is really helpful is I read the essay out loud. If it sounds awkward spoken then it will sound awkward to the admissions people.



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